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EERA 10-year Anniversary Conference - Brussels, 26-27 June 2018

26/06/2018

AboutRegistration and Practical informationProgramme at a glanceSessionsSpeakersHighlightsVideosPhoto gallery

The EERA 10-year anniversary conference (26-27 June, Brussels) is approaching. Check out the final programme and register by June 22

What are the present and the future of the European energy community? How can stakeholders in energy research & innovation cooperate to contribute to the implementation of the SET-Plan and make the Energy Union happen? What are the big trends in energy transition and what technology developments will disrupt our way of thinking, producing and consuming energy in the future?

Join EERA for a two-day event to discuss this and more with key representatives from EU institutions, Member States, international organisations, research, industry, citizens organisations and other stakeholders.

Our speakers are lined up and include: Jean-Eric Paquet, Director General, DG Research & Innovation (EC); Dominique Ristori, Director General, DG Energy (EC); Henna Virkkunen, Member of the European Parliament, ITRE Committee; Patrick Child, Deputy Director General, DG Research & Innovation (EC); Tudor Constantinescu, Principal Adviser to the Director General, DG Energy (EC); Isabella Plimon, Head of Department for Energy Technology and Innovation for the Austrian Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism; Peter Vis, Adviser at the European Commission’s European Political Strategy Centre; Stéphane Nicolas, Director of Cabinet Government of Brussels Capital; Nils Røkke, EERA Chairman.

Jeremy Leggett – Founder and Director of Solarcentury – will provide his perspective on visions for a sustainable energy future.

 

Please find all necessary information regarding the conference on the following pages or in our conference booklet.

 

Registration & practical information

 

Venue: The SQUARE – Brussels Convention Centre

Coudenberg 3, B-1000 – Brussels

 

26 June, 9:00 – 18:00 (registration & welcome coffee 8:00 – 9:00)

27 June, 9:00 – 12:00

 

For additional information: secretariat@eera-set.eu

 

 

Click here to register

Registration deadline: 22 June 2018

We look forward to welcoming you at the EERA 10-year Anniversary Conference!

 

 

Programme

For the programme of each individual session, please go to “Sessions”

DAY 1 – 26 June

DAY 2 – 27 June

 

08:00 – 09:00 Registration and welcome coffee

09:00 – 09:15 Welcome address by Nils Røkke, Chairman of EERA

09:20 – 11:05 SESSION I
Research & Innovation at the  core of the Energy Union

11:05 – 11:40 Coffee Break

11:45 – 13:15 SESSION II
Stakeholder collaboration in R&I for EU Energy Transition

13:15 – 14:15 Lunch Break

14:20 – 15:50 SESSION III
EERA catalysing European alignment:  driving bottom-up alignment, fostering top-down convergence

15:50 – 16:20 Coffee Break

16:25 – 18:00 SESSION IV
Megatrends in energy transition

 

08:30 – 09:00 Welcome coffee

09:00 – 10:30 SESSION V
The systemic nature of energy transition

10:30 – 11:00 Coffee Break

11:00 – 11:45 SESSION VI
Visions for a sustainable energy future

11:45 – 12:00 Concluding remarks

 

Sessions

Session I

Session I

Research & Innovation at the core of the Energy Union

Research and innovation in low carbon energy technologies is a crucial element of the EU’s energy strategy, and constitutes the fifth dimension of the Energy Union. Since 2007 the SET-Plan has been the research and innovation pillar of the EU’s energy and climate policy.

EERA, as backbone of the SET-Plan, has over the past decade delivered on its objectives by supporting the coordination of energy research for a low carbon Europe. After achieving game-changing progress in the competitiveness of several low carbon technologies, the focus will increasingly be on addressing the systemic nature of the energy system as a whole – for example:

  • How can high penetration of intermittent and distributed energy sources be integrated in the overall system?
  • How will gas play a role as feedstock, energy vector and energy storage?

The panel will discuss key contributions from the European energy research community to accelerating transition to a clean energy system.

 

The panel

 

WELCOME SPEECH

Nils Røkke EERA Chairman

 

MODERATOR

Jacki Davis Managing Director, Meade Davis Communications

 

KEYNOTE SPEECHES

Maroš Šefčovič European Commission Vice-President for Energy Union (Video)

Henna Virkkunen Member of the European Parliament – Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

Dominique Ristori  Director General, DG Energy, European Commission

Peter Vis Adviser, European Commission’s Political Strategy Centre

Isabella Plimon Head of Department for Energy Technology and Innovation for the Austrian Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism

 

Session II

Session II

Stakeholder collaboration in R&I for EU Energy Transition

Coordinating over 250 research organisations and representing about 50.000 researchers across 30 European countries, EERA is the largest organisation representing the energy research community in Europe.

With European funding representing less than 10% of the total public research funding available across Europe, the execution of the SET-Plan Implementation Plans relies essentially on transnational collaboration and in particular on the mobilisation of funding from Member States (MS) and Associated Countries (AC).

In addition to public funding, it is crucial to secure to the contribution of the private sector to ensure research results are properly transformed into competitive energy products and services.

Finally, no transition can occur without a continuous involvement of the civil society to ensure a sustainable appropriation of the transition by the citizens.

The panel will discuss the importance of European alignment in meeting the SET-Plan objectives and the complementary roles played by the research community, governments, industry and civil society as a whole, in contributing to coordinate priorities and resources.

 

The panel

 

MODERATOR

Jacki Davis Managing Director, Meade Davis Communications

 

KEYNOTE SPEECH

Jean-Eric Paquet Director General, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission

 

SPEAKERS

Piotr Swiatek German National Contact Point for Energy in H2020 and SET-Plan Steering Group Representative Member for Germany

Fabrice Stassin Managing Director, Energy Materials Industrial Research Initiative

Alessandro Provaggi Head of the DHC+ Technology Platform c/o Euroheat & Power and Chairman of the Cross-cutting panel for the ETIP on Renewable Heating and Cooling

Josh Roberts Advocacy Officer on Clean Energy for All Europeans at the European federation of groups and cooperatives of citizens for renewable energy, REScoop.eu

Peter Hauge Madsen EERA Joint Program Coordinator for Wind Energy and SET-Plan Temporary Working Group Member on Off-shore Wind

 

Session III

Session III

EERA catalysing European alignment: driving bottom-up alignment, fostering top-down convergence

Structuring a “bottom-up” institutional alignment has been the primary and original focus of EERA, resulting in the strong and unique convergence of efforts towards sharing research agendas across organizations within and across EU Member States (MS) and Associated Countries (AC).

At the outset of the critical execution phase of the SET-Plan, increasing the convergence of SET-Plan countries’ priorities – representing more than 90% of the research funds that can be mobilised – is a key challenge on which much of the SET-Plan success will depend.

Notwithstanding the political autonomy of MS and AC in research funding allocation, EERA – through its wide European coverage and the close connections that its members have with national stakeholders – constitutes a unique platform to support higher convergence of SET-Plan countries’ priorities towards the SET-Plan objectives.

Acknowledging the complexity of the challenge, EERA has launched a unique initiative gathering stakeholders from a reference group of SET-Plan countries, in an effort to identify best strategies to accelerate the execution of the SET-Plan Implementation Plans.

The panel, that includes key members of this reference group, will highlight the considerable benefits that better European alignment could deliver and will propose recommendations on how best to achieve this objective.

 

The panel

 

MODERATOR

Jacki Davis Managing Director, Meade Davis Communications

 

KEYNOTE SPEECH

Patrick Child Deputy Director General, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission

 

SPEAKERS

Adel El Gammal Secretary General, European Energy Research Alliance

Ane Torvanger Brunvoll Special Advisor, Department of Energy, Research Council of Norway

Sophie van Eck Senior Policy Advisor, Netherlands Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy

Pascal Newton Project Manager Energy Europe at the French Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation

Alicia Mignone Chair Committee on Energy Research and Technology at the International Energy Agency

 

Session IV

Session IV

Megatrends in energy transition

While accelerating the energy transition has become one of the greatest needs for our society, it becomes increasingly evident how deeply intertwined energy is with all aspects of our modern societies and lifestyles.

Therefore, driving the energy transition requires to both fully embrace and anticipate the impacts of the megatrends shaping our technological and societal development.

This session will address three selected megatrends considered as central to the energy transition: the digitalisation of energy, the power of citizens’ choice on shaping the demand, and circular economy.

 

The panel

MODERATOR

Jacki Davis Managing Director, Meade Davis Communications

 

KEYNOTE SPEECH

Tudor Constantinescu Principal Adviser to Director General, DG Energy, European Commission

 

SPEAKERS

Damien Ernst Full Professor at University of Liège (ULG), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Ray Pinto Policy and Member Relations Director, DIGITALEUROPE

Brooke Flanagan Project coordinator at EUROCITIES

Lidia Borrell-Damian Director for Research and Innovation (R&I), European University Association (EUA)

 

Session V

Session V

The systemic nature of energy transition

The Integrated SET-Plan, launched in 2015, highlighted the systemic nature of energy and the need to approach transition from a multi-disciplinary and cross-sectorial approach.

Capitalising on the improvements achieved in many of the SET-Plan energy technologies, it is now essential to bridge the technological silos through a better understanding of the implications of a rapidly changing energy mix, of an expected fast electrification of energy and of the effects of large-scale power-to-gas conversion on the power, gas and carbon sectors and their interactions.

This fundamental re-thinking is also reflected in the ongoing discussions about Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research & Innovation. EERA covers the full range of pre-commercial low carbon technologies and captures the systemic and multi-disciplinary nature of the transition through horizontal system programmes. It is therefore ideally positioned to contribute in defining the future systemic R&D&I challenges that will pave the way to a competitive, fair and prosperous low carbon energy regime in Europe.

The panel will give the opportunity to discuss systemic interactions across technologies and how they underpin the overarching grand societal challenges, notably in the context of Horizon Europe.

 

The panel

 

CHAIR

Adel El Gammal Secretary General, European Energy Research Alliance

 

KEYNOTE SPEECH

Stéphane Nicolas Director of Cabinet of Céline Fremault, Minister of Housing, Quality of Life, Environment, Energy, Assistance to People and Persons with Disabilities – Government of Brussels Capital

 

SPEAKERS

Daniele Agostini Head of Low Carbon and European Energy Policies, Enel

Daniela Velte Programme Coordinator of EERA Joint Programme on economic, environmental and social impacts of energy policies and technologies

Lorenzo Malerba Programme Coordinator of EERA Joint Programme on Nuclear Materials

Edel Sheridan Coordinator of subprogramme for Electrochemical Energy Storage in EERA Joint Programme Energy Storage

Annemie Wyckmans Programme Coordinator of EERA Joint Programme on Smart Cities

 

Session VI

Session VI

Visions for a sustainable energy future

Jeremy Leggett Founder and Chair, SolarAid; Founder and Director, Solarcentury

Jeremy Leggett is an award-winning social entrepreneur and critically-acclaimed author whose books include The Carbon War, Half Gone, The Energy of Nations, and The Winning Of The Carbon War. He is founder and a director of Solarcentury, the UK’s fastest growing renewable energy company active on four continents, winner of a Queen’s Award for Enterprise in Innovation and many other awards. He is also founder and chairman of SolarAid, an African solar lighting charity itself parent to a non-profit social venture, SunnyMoney, that has sold almost 2 million solar lights in Africa and won a BITC Unilever Global Development Award.

With its understanding of energy economy and geopolitics, Jeremy Leggett will share, beyond technology, its visions on what profound political, market and societal transformations are required to address some of the severest, yet vastly unaddressed challenges for human civilization.

 

Keynote Speakers

 

Nils A. Røkke

EERA Chairman

Nils A. Røkke is Executive Vice President Sustainability at SINTEF, Scandinavia’s largest R&D Institute. Member of the management board of SINTEF. He holds a PhD in combustion from NTH (NTNU). Since May 2017 he is Chairman of EERA. He was Gas Turbine Design and Development Manager in Rolls Royce Marine before returning to SINTEF in 2002 as Vice President Gas Technologies and Director of the Gas Technology Centre NTNU-SINTEF. He is member of the European ZEP (Zero Emission Power) Advisory Council, co-chair of the Executive Committee of ZEP and member of the Divisional Board (Energy, Resources and Environment) of the Norwegian Research Council (RCN). Nils is Board member of the Norwegian Climate Foundation and Chair of ECCSEL (European CCS Labs), an energy ESFRI lab.

 

Maroš Šefčovič

European Commission Vice-President for Energy Union

Maroš Šefčovič is a Slovak career diplomat and since 1 November 2014 Vice President of the European Commission in charge of the Energy Union. In this capacity, he leads the “Energy Union” Project Team within the Commission which comprises of 14 commissioners.  In 2014 he was elected as the Member of the European Parliament.  From 2010 – 2014 he was Vice President of the European Commission in charge of Inter-Institutional Relations and Administration. In 2009-2010, he was European Commissioner for Education, Training, Culture and Youth. From 2004 -2009, he was the Permanent Representative of the Slovak Republic to the European Union. As diplomat by profession he served between 1992 and 2004 in Zimbabwe and Canada and as Ambassador to Israel.  He graduated from the University of Economy in Bratislava and the Moscow State Institute for Foreign Relations. He holds a degree as Doctor of Law and a PhD of European Law from the Comenius University, Faculty of Law, Bratislava. He also studied at Stanford University, USA.  He has recently published a book on his first mandate as Vice-President entitled “Driving the EU forward – straight talks with Maroš Šefčovič” (John Harper Publishing, London 2014

 

Henna Virkkunen

Member of the European Parliament

Henna Virkkunen has been a member of the European Parliament since 2014 and is a member of the European People’s Party (EPP). Her primary committee is the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) and she is a substitute member of the committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN).  Before Ms Virkkunen was elected to the European Parliament, she served as a Minister of Transport and Local Government in Finland. She has also been a Minister of Public Administration and Local Government and a Minister of Education, during her two terms as a Member of the Parliament of Finland.

 

Jean-Eric Paquet

Director-General of DG Research and Innovation, European Commission

Jean-Eric Paquet is Director-General of the DG Research and Innovation of the European Commission from 1 April 2018. He began his career in the European Commission in 1993 in the Directorate-General for Transport. In 1999 he joined the office of G. Verheugen, former Commissioner for Enlargement. In 2002 he became the Deputy Head of Cabinet of P. Busquin, former Commissioner for Research. Mr Paquet was EU Ambassador in Mauritania between 2004 and 2007. He returned to transport in 2007 where he led the development of the Trans-European Transport Network policy. As Director for the “European Mobility Network” he was responsible for Europe’s transport infrastructure policy and investment strategies, the single European rail area, inland waterways and port policy. He joined DG Enlargement in November 2013. In November 2015 he was appointed Deputy Secretary-General of the European Commission in charge of Policy Coordination and Better Regulation, dealing among others with the European Semester for economic policy coordination, energy and climate-related policies, as well as social and employment policies.

 

Dominique Ristori

Director-General, DG Energy, European Commission

Dominique Ristori has worked in the European Commission since 1978 and has held several senior positions. Prior to his current posting, he was Director-General of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) from 2010 to 2013. Between 2006 and 2010, Mr Ristori was Deputy Director-General of DG Energy and Transport. From 2000 to 2006, as Director in charge of General Affairs and Resources in DG Energy and Transport, he was responsible for interinstitutional relations; enlargement and international relations; coordination of energy and transport research; internal market, state aids, infringements and public service obligations; passengers’ and users’ rights, as well as central management of human and budgetary resources. Between 1996 and 1999, he was Director in charge of European Energy Policy in DG XVII (Energy). Mr Ristori played an important role in the preparation and adoption process of the two first Directives on the Internal Market for gas and electricity.

 

Patrick Child

Deputy Director General, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission

Patrick Child has been Deputy Director General of DG Research and Innovation since April 2016. In his function he has specific responsibility for the Commission’s research and innovation policy on clean energy technologies as well as in the environmental and climate sector. He is the Commission representative and elected chair of the steering committee of Mission Innovation (a coalition of 23 countries committed to doubling research in clean energy by 2020). He is also responsible for the overall co-ordination of the EU’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation budget (EUR 77 billion for 2014-2020). A mathematician by training, Patrick Child joined the European Commission in 1994, where he held several leading positions, such as Managing Directorthe European External Service.

 

 

Tudor Constantinescu

Principal Adviser to Director-General, DG Energy, European Commission

Dr Tudor Constantinescu is Principal Adviser to the Director General for Energy in the European Commission since March 2011. He is engineer and economist by education. Before joining the Commission, he set up as Executive Director the Buildings Performance Institute Europe. He was the president of the Romanian Agency for Energy Conservation and for the period 2008-2009, he ensured the presidency of the EnR network of European Energy Agencies. Between 1996-2007, he coordinated the energy efficiency and related environmental activities of the Energy Charter Secretariat in Brussels.

 

 

Peter Vis

Adviser at the European Commission’s European Political Strategy Centre

Peter is an Adviser at the European Commission’s European Political Strategy Centre since 1 April 2018. For the academic year 2014-2015 Peter was the EU Visiting Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford University, UK. He has worked for the European Commission for 28 years, mostly in the areas of climate change, renewable energy and transport. From 2010-2014 he was Head of Cabinet to the European Commissioner for Climate Action, Connie Hedegaard. He also worked in the Cabinet of Andris Piebalgs, European Commissioner for Energy from 2007-2010.

Peter was previously an Adviser in DG MOVE (Transport & Mobility) where he specialised in the decarbonisation of transport.

 

Stéphane Nicolas

Director of Cabinet of Céline Fremault, Minister of Housing, Quality of Life, Environment, Energy, Assistance to People and Persons with Disabilities – Government of Brussels Capital

Lawyer with a Master’s degree in European and International Environmental Law from the University of London (Master in International and European Environmental Law, University of London, QMW College, UK) Stéphane Nicolas was the Government Delegate in the framework of international climate negotiations (UNFCCC) between 2009 and 2013. He was also an expert in charge of energy, environment and climate in several Walloon ministerial cabinets. Since 2014, Stéphane Nicolas is the Director of Cabinet of Céline Fremault, Minister in charge of Housing, Quality of Life, Environment, Energy, Assistance to People and Persons with Disabilities within the Government of Brussels Capital.

 

 

Isabella Plimon

Director for Energy Technology and Innovation, Austrian Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism

Isabella Plimon is the Director for Energy Technology and Innovation at the Austrian Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism. She also represents Austria in the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET-Plan) and the Horizon 2020 Energy Program Committee. Before joining the department Isabella worked as an Advisor for international energy and environmental affairs to the Vice-Chancellor of Austria. Isabella has also represented Austrian businesses on a national, EU and international level focusing on energy and climate policy for several years. Isabella holds degrees from Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien and Technische Universität Berlin.

 

Jeremy Leggett

Founder and Chair, SolarAid; Founder and Director, Solarcentury

Jeremy Leggett is an award-winning social entrepreneur and critically-acclaimed author whose books include The Carbon War, Half Gone, The Energy of Nations, and The Winning Of The Carbon War. He is founder and a director of Solarcentury, the UK’s fastest growing renewable energy company active on four continents, winner of a Queen’s Award for Enterprise in Innovation and many other awards. He is also founder and chairman of SolarAid, an African solar lighting charity itself parent to a non-profit social venture, SunnyMoney, that has sold almost 2 million solar lights in Africa and won a BITC Unilever Global Development Award.

With its understanding of energy economy and geopolitics, Jeremy Leggett will share, beyond technology, its visions on what profound political, market and societal transformations are required to address some of the severest, yet vastly unaddressed challenges for human civilization.

 

 

Speakers

Adel El Gammal

EERA Secretary General 

Adel El Gammal is a recognized expert and a senior EU Affairs professional in the fields of low carbon technologies, energy transition, and climate change. Before joining EERA as Secretary General, Adel was active for the last 10 years in the EU climate energy debate, notably as Director of the Becquerel Institute, a consultancy providing advanced research and intelligence on the energy transition, and Secretary General of the EU PV Industry Association (EPIA, now SolarPower Europe), where he launched the SET-Plan Solar Europe Industry Initiative (SEII). Adel is a civil engineer from Ecole Polytechnique of Brussels, holds degrees in Business Administration from Solvay Business School (Belgium) and Insead (France) and later specialized in Environment Management (IGEAT, Belgium).

 

 

Daniele Agostini

Head of Low Carbon and European Energy Policies, Enel

As the head of Low Carbon and European Energy Policies within the European Affairs Department of Enel Holding, Daniele Agostini is responsible for policy analysis and corporate position development on Low Carbon Policies across the over 30 countries in which Enel operates.  Prior to joining Enel, Mr. Agostini led the environmental advisory group of a global management consulting company in Italy. Mr. Agostini holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering with a minor in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, USA), a Master of Science in Water Resources Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley (USA) and a Master of Science in Environmental and Resources Economics from University College London (UCL, UK).

 

Lidia Borrell-Damian

Director for Research and Innovation (R&I), European University Association (EUA)

Dr. Lidia Borrell-Damian is Director for Research and Innovation (R&I) at EUA since 2014. She is responsible for the overall portfolio of EUA’s R&I activities, coordinating EU R&I policy development based on the evidence provided by EUA universities and National Rectors’ Conferences. Her areas of work include the EU Funds for R&I; the European Research Area priorities; the EU Digital Agenda; Open Science and Doctoral Education. She coordinates scientific policy input through the EUA-Energy and Environment Platform (EUA-EPUE) and manages relations with major energy EU stakeholders in the SET-Plan, such as the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA) and InnoEnergy. Lidia Borrell-Damian holds a Doctorate in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Specialty (photovoltaics), from the University of Barcelona (1987).

 

Damien Ernst

Full Professor at University of Liège (ULG) · Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Damien Ernst received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering from the University of Liège, Belgium, in 1998 and 2003, respectively. He is currently Full Professor at the University of Liège, where he is affiliated with the Montefiore Research Unit. His research interests include  reinforcement learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence, and electrical energy system. Damien Ernst has particularly focused these last four years on the study of circular economy models for electricity exchanges.   He has co-authored more than 300 research papers and two books. He has also won numerous awards for his research.

 

Brooke Flanagan

Project coordinator at EUROCITIES

Brooke Flanagan is project coordinator at EUROCITIES. Brooke has over 20 years’ experience working in the energy, environment and local government sectors in Europe, the UK and Australia, for government, industry and NGOs. Brooke has undertaken research and campaigned on a range of issues including energy efficiency and climate change, and various environmental protection projects. Prior to joining EUROCITIES, she advised the Mayor and Deputy Mayor of London on climate and energy policy, established a not-for-profit policy and research consultancy – Future Climate – and headed up the policy and research activities of the Energy Saving Trust. Brooke has a degree in Environmental Assessment and Management from Newcastle University and a Master of

 

 

 

Peter Hauge Madsen

DTU/EERA Joint Programme Coordinator for Wind Energy

Peter Hauge Madsen is head of the department, DTU Wind Energy, at the Technical University of Denmark. PHM has been involved with energy research and research management for more than 30 years, primarily in the field of wind energy, working also in industry (Siemens Wind Power and Det Norske Veritas). PHM is active in international standardization and cooperation and chairs the Danish national committee for wind turbine standardization, the European Energy Research Alliance’s Joint Program for Wind Energy, the Accident Investigation Board for offshore installations. He is member of the Board of the Danish Wind Industry Association and of various steering committees, including ETIPWind and UNI-SET. He holds a MSc and a PhD from the Technical University of Denmark.

 

Lorenzo Malerba

SCK•CEN/Programme Coordinator of EERA Joint Programme on Nuclear Materials

Lorenzo Malerba, Italian, nuclear engineer, received his PhD in industrial engineering at the Technical University of Madrid. In 2000 he joined the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK•CEN. His research focused on modelling nuclear materials behaviour in operation, with responsibilities in most relevant European projects. He authored more than 130 peer-reviewed articles and about 50 proceedings papers. In 2010 he joined the then starting EERA JPNM as responsible for the subprogramme on structural materials modelling, becoming coordinator in 2014. This experience enlarged his interests to GenIV & fusion reactor systems, nuclear energy sustainability and energy policy in Europe.

 

Alicia Mignone

Chair of the Committee on Energy Research and Technology of the International Energy Agency (IEA)

Alicia Mignone is Chair of the Committee on Energy Research and Technology of the IEA since 2014 Ministry and Alternate Governing Board representative. She is Senior Energy Expert at the Italian of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. She has managed research activities in Argentina and Italy, represented Italy in numerous international bodies and participated in the G8/G7 Energy process. Other previous assignments include: team leader of EC Development Cooperation projects; participant in informal experts’ discussions for the EU External Energy Policy and in the consultation process for Research Infrastructures; Italian Delegate for International Cooperation in FP7 and Scientific Attaché and Energy Advisor to the Permanent Delegation of Italy to OECD – IEA. She was Senior Scientist at ENEA in Italy (1978-1996). She graduated in Chemistry at the National Buenos Aires University.

 

Pascal Newton

Project Manager Energy Europe at the French Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation

Chemist and physicist by training, Dr Pascal Newton is currently the Sherpa of representative of the French Ministry of higher education, research and innovation in the SET Plan steering group since 2013. For Horizon 2020, the European R&I framework programme, Pascal is also the French representative in the Horizon 2020 Energy Programme Committee and one of the French Energy NCPs. He works also on the issue of synergies of funds, mainly of ERDF with Horizon 2020. Before that he worked during seven years in a research organism and dealt with regional authorities for the purpose of implementing territorial research projects.

 

Ray Pinto 

Policy and Member Relations Director, DIGITALEUROPE

Ray joins DIGITALEUROPE with over 20 years of government affairs and communications experience in Brussels and across the EMEA region. Previously, he worked at Microsoft being part of the team responsible for the strategies to improve relations with governments and position the company on socio-economic issues. Ray leads the digital transformation strategy to leverage DIGITALEUROPE’s expertise in key policy areas such as data protection, media, platform and consumer issues. Ray leads several Policy and Working Groups helping our members advance important work in areas which includes artificial intelligence, skills development and the free flow of data. Ray holds citizenship with both Canada and France and is a graduate of McGill University in Political Science.

 

Alessandro Provaggi

Head of the DHC+ Technology Platform c/o Euroheat & Power and Chairman of the Cross-cutting panel for the ETIP on Renewable Heating and Cooling

Alessandro Provaggi leads the DHC+ Technology Platform – the European hub for R&D in District Heating and Cooling – at Euroheat & Power and he has been actively involved in the ETIP on Renewable Heating and Cooling since several years. Passionate about getting to a 100% sustainable energy model as soon as possible, Alessandro has more than 10 years of experience in EU policy, project management and communications. Before joining Euroheat & Power, he worked for EUREC, the association of European renewable energy research centres and previously for the European Commission (EuropeAid) and the European Parliament. He is a former Visiting Scholar at Stanford University and he studied at Bologna University, Madrid Complutense, Solvay Brussels School and Boston University.

 

Josh Roberts

Advocacy Officer, REScoop.eu

Since January 2017, Josh has served as Advocacy Officer of REScoop.eu, a federation that represents citizen cooperative and energy initiatives around Europe that work on renewable energy, energy efficiency, and other clean energy technologies. Josh coordinates REScoop.eu’s input into the negotiations on the EU’s clean energy package legislation. A qualified lawyer in California since 2010, Josh has been actively involved in the European energy policy since 2012. As climate and energy lawyer for ClientEarth, he has focused on internal energy market, renewables, infrastructure, and community/citizen participation issues. Josh earned his Juris Doctorate from McGeorge School of law, and he has an LL.M. in Environmental Law & Policy at University College London. He is also a member of the World Commission on Environmental Law.

 

Edel Sheridan

Coordinator of subprogramme for Electrochemical Energy Storage in EERA JP Energy Storage 

Dr. Edel Sheridan is a research scientist at SINTEF, one of Scandinavia’s largest research organisations. She is part of the New Energy Solutions team at SINTEF Industry, who perform research in the fields of fuel cells, electrolysers, supercapacitors and batteries. Her own research experience is varied conducting polymer sensors during her PhD at Maynooth University, Ireland, to gas separation membrane technology at NTNU and materials development for supercapacitors, Li ion, Mg ion and Zinc-air batteries at SINTEF, Norway. Edel coordinates the subprogram for Electrochemical Energy Storage in the European Energy Research Alliance for Energy Storage and is familiar with industries engaged in battery technology.

 

Fabrice Stassin

Managing Director, Energy Materials Industrial Research Initiative (EMIRI)

Fabrice Stassin is Managing Director of the Energy Materials Industrial Research Initiative (EMIRI)Association. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry & Materials Science and a Master in Management & Entrepreneurship. In the past he worked as Managing Director of an RTO in white biotech and as Strategy Consultant at Accenture. In 2008 he joined Umicore as innovation manager and, since 2012, he has been part of Umicore Government Affairs, focusing on energy materials. Fabrice Stassin was instrumental in the development of EMIRI, which he has managed since 2014. EMIRI represents more than 50 organizations active in advanced materials for clean energy & clean mobility technologies. The association contributes to the industrial leadership of the field by advocating for an appropriate innovation, industrial and energy policy framework in Europe.

 

Piotr Swiatek

German National Contact Point for Energy in Horizon2020 and SET-Plan Steering Group Representative Member for Germany

Piotr Swiatek is a German physicist Polish origin. He got his PhD in Solid State Physics from University of Cologne. 1986-2001 he worked as physicist in Research Centre Juelich, Germany.

He was Project Manager of “Fit for Europe” run by European Liaison Office of German Research Organisations KoWi untill 2003. 2004-2008 Piotr Swiatek was a Senior Science Officer at COST in Brussels. Currently he works for the Programme Management Agency PtJ in Juelich as a H2020 National Contact Point Energy. Besides, he carries many educational activities on R&D cooperation and  management.

 

 

 

Sophie van Eck

Senior Policy Adviser, Netherlands Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy

Sophie van Eck works as a senior policy advisor at the Netherlands Ministry of Economic  Affairs and Climate Policy.  She coordinates the input of the Dutch government to international energy-innovation collaboration frameworks, such as the Strategic Energy Technology (SET) – Plan, Mission Innovation and the Technology Collaboration Programs of the International Energy Agency. Furthermore, she works on national and European energy-efficiency policies.

 

Ane Torvanger Brunvoll

Special Advisor, Department of Energy, Research Council of Norway

Ane Torvanger Brunvoll is a recognized expert within research and innovation of sustainable energy and climate solutions and has more than 20 year of experience as a leader and manager in public and private sector.

Currently she is head of the largest thematic program (ENERGIX) in The Research Council of Norway. The program provides funding for research on renewable energy, energy efficient, energy systems and energy policy. The program holds an annual budget of approx 50 million Euro.

 

Daniela Velte

TECNALIA/ Programme Coordinator of EERA Joint Programme on economic, environmental and social impacts of energy policies and technologies

Daniela Velte is a member of POINT, Tecnalia´s expert group for Innovation and Technology Policies. She works with the Office of Technology Evaluation of the European Parliament (STOA) on energy technologies and is the coordinator of the EERA Joint Programme e3s “Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of Energy Policies and Technologies.”  Her recent studies include the H2020 project “ECHOES Energy CHOices supporting the Energy Union and the Set-Plan”, as well as an analysis of options for reindustrialization of the European PV industry and the evaluation of business opportunities related to Smart Grid Technologies for EASME.

 

Annemie Wyckmans

NTNU/Programme Coordinator of EERA Joint Programme on Smart Cities

Professor Annemie Wyckmans is head of NTNU Smart Sustainable Cities at the NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Architecture and Design. She has an MSc in Architectural Engineering from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, a PhD in Building Technology and a postdoctoral degree on education for environment-friendly architecture from NTNU. She is project coordinator of the URBAN-EU-CHINA Innovation Platform of Sustainable Urbanisation, programme coordinator of the EERA Joint Programme Smart Cities, project leader of SiNoPSE Sino-Norwegian Partnership in Sustainable Energy, and of PI-SEC Planning Instruments for Smart Energy Communities. Her main goal is to promote smart sustainable cities, through research, innovation and education. She leads several cooperation projects with public and private sector in Norway, EU and China.

 

Moderator

 

Jacki Davis

Managing Director, Meade Davis Communications

Jacki Davis is a leading commentator and analyst on European Union affairs. She is a very experienced journalist, speaker and moderator of high-level events both in Brussels and in EU national capitals, the editor of many publications, a regular broadcaster on television and radio news programmes and documentaries commenting on EU issues, and both a Senior Adviser and member of the Governing Board at the Brussels-based think tank, the European Policy Centre. She has been based in Brussels for more than 25 years, and was previously Communications Director of the European Policy Centre; launch editor and editor-in-chief of E!Sharp, a monthly magazine on EU affairs launched in 2001; the launch editor of European Voice, a Brussels-based weekly newspaper on EU affairs owned by The Economist Group, from 1995-2000 (which has now become Politico); and the Brussels correspondent of a British national newspaper.

 

 

 

Highlights

Below, you will find some highlights and insights into the conference – excellent speakers shared their views within six panels.

Session I – Research & Innovation at the core of the Energy Union

  • The 20-20-20 targets have been reached – it’s time to look ahead: towards 2030 and 2050
  • Energy is a global issue – but the Paris Agreement and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals rely on Europe’s efforts
  • Broaden the view:
    • Better connect energy with other areas – agriculture, climate, environment, transport
    • Address cross-cutting issues
    • Take industry on board, beyond existing structures
    • Increase streamlining European and national efforts
  • EERA plays a crucial role in this endeavour

 

Session II – Stakeholder collaboration in R&I for EU Energy Transition

  • Smart alignment of research priorities – where it makes sense and where it is possible
  • It’s rather easy to agree on common priorities – implementation is the hard part
  • It’s not just about technology and funding, but also about education, shared infrastructures and data, researcher mobility, and a common culture
  • Communication and trust are key…
  • …and so are citizens – not just as passive consumers but as active contributors to change and innovation
  • EERA is well positioned to bring the stakeholders together, to create communities and facilitate dialogue

 

Session III – EERA catalysing European alignment: driving bottom-up alignment, fostering top-down convergence

  • Congratulations, EERA, for 10 years of successful work and for setting a true role model – but with great results comes great responsibility
  • Some ideas for the next 10 years:
    • Expand your community – for sure among Eastern European organisations and maybe also towards industry?
    • Be an integral part of the execution phase of the SET implementation plans
    • Horizon Europe leads the way: cross-cutting, interdisciplinary, and systemic approaches are very much needed
    • Be open to improvement and review your work constantly against carefully designed KPIs
    • Increase the impact and build on the trust you’ve already earned so far

 

Session IV – Megatrends in energy transition

  • Megatrend 1: digitalisation of energy
    Massive amounts of data and intelligent machines change the way energy is produced and used
  • Megatrend 2: power of citizens’ choice on shaping the demand
    Cities provide the level of government that is closest to the citizens and are thus ideal spaces for co-creation. But keep in mind: not all people want the same level of engagement
  • Megatrend 3: circular economy
    We are witnessing the rise of microgrids
  • What all megatrends have in common: they need new types of workforce, integrating new skills – without neglecting the traditional ones

 

Session V – The systemic nature of energy transition

  • Citizens are the driving force behind energy transition
    • A so-far technology and policy-driven sector is becoming societal
    • We need open innovation to accelerate the energy transition, develop things together with society, engage society in the creation process
    • The systemic nature of energy transition needs a cultural change. So social sciences need to be integrated.
  • Infrastructure is crucial for a systemic approach but has been neglected for a long time
  • Moving from a centralised to decentralised model – proper planning and proper tools are needed
  • EERA is the only community where all energy sectors are represented together

 

Session VI – Visions for a sustainable energy future

  • The energy transition is happening and it is pretty irreversible
  • For the first time, more than 10 mill people work in renewables
  • Highest investment in 2017 on renewables: solar, wind second
  • 43 cities are now 100% powered by renewables
  • Air pollution kills 7 million per year due to fossil fuels, says WHO
  • Find out more about Jeremy’s book “The Winning of The Carbon War” here

 

Videos

What has been EERA’s contribution during its 10-year journey? Below a few examples and related videos.

Who powers the renewables revolution?

Almost every day a new story emerges about the plunging costs and soaring uptake of renewable energies. In just May 2018, India announced that it had installed more renewable than coal capacity last year, Denmark promised to go fossil fuel-free by 2050, the UK generated more power from wind than nuclear for a whole quarter and California approved a mandate for solar panels on all new homes.

There is no mystery about the motive for this trend. Last month, the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) reported the third warmest April on record – after 2016 and 2017. The Bering Sea’s ice cover also fell to its lowest ever level, as atmospheric CO2 concentrations soared to the highest ever, at 414 ppm.

But while the climate crisis is clearly driving the renewable revolution, the question remains: who is powering it?

In Europe, the largest energy research hub is the European energy research alliance (EERA), with over 50,000 experts, spread across 250 research centres and universities in 30 European states. EERA’s 17 Joint Programmes have accelerated the development, deployment and uptake of low carbon technologies, in line with the EU’s SET-Plan. EERA has taken a leading role in coordinating the energy research and development community and works extensively to define priorities and activities together with industry and other key stakeholders. EERA began under the umbrella of the EU’s SET-Plan, and contributes to all its action plans.

Its achievements have been as remarkable as they are unsung. Through collaboration at Cheetah, the EU’s Integrated Research Project (IRP) under FP7, scientists from the EERA Joint Programme Photovoltaic Solar Energy (JP PV) have slashed the thickness of crystalline-silicon solar cell wafers in half, reducing their cost by 20%. The breakthrough has opened up new uses for the thinner solar cells, in aeronautics and space.  It was achieved by utilising more reliable – and environmentally-friendly – material. Cheetah’s work has shaved a decade off the Solar PV industry’s roadmap and brought forward the day of full decarbonisation in Europe.

EERA research has been leveraged by innovative and cross-cutting national and EU-wide funding streams. For example, the STAGE-STE IRP (FP7) on concentrated solar power and solar thermal electricity – coordinated by the EERA Joint Programme Concentrated Solar Power (JP CSP) – has leveraged €100m from national projects, €80m from other EU projects, €100m for national projects, and €200m from EU project funding from IRP’s and industry cooperation partners – a great example of contribution to coordinating R&I agenda and resources in the field.

These are substantial sums but the cost-efficiency of these ground-breaking projects is truly eye watering. In the field of wind energy, EERA Joint Programme Wind is pioneering the development of integral design codes for large scale wind turbines, which have a power generation potential of above 20MW. This cost-cutting leap in scale will be key to maintaining Europe’s technological leadership in the sector and should be ready for deployment within five years.

Researchers at EERA JP Wind have developed a large portfolio of research projects cofounded by national programmes, industry and EU. Amongst the largest parties within JP Wind, about 50 % of the income comes from industry, as partners in basic and applied research projects, and through more commercial-oriented projects. Experience has shown that research gives value to society and pays back in economic terms. For example, through the EU FP7 project IRP Wind, scientists at JP Wind are seeing crucial progress in blade sub-component testing that is set to make wind energy ever cheaper and more competitive. The NOWITECH center on offshore wind in Norway (powered by the EERA JP Wind member SINTEF and industry) has devised 40 innovations since 2009 – their estimated value of €5bn is 100 times more than the centre’s total budget. But that funding stream has paid for projects that will cut electricity losses from subsea transmission cables, allow robotised turbine inspections, new durable coatings for harsh offshore environments, and software tools to design offshore wind farms, and software that will hone their operation and maintenance capacities.

Another flagship of EERA’s commitment to making transformative ideas a reality is the EU GEMex project (Horizon2020), an unconventional geothermal energy collaboration between European and Mexican research institutions, universities and industry. This project, powered by EERA`s Joint Programme Geothermal, will enable the development of superhot or engineered geothermal systems. If successful, it will result in much higher 24/7 electricity generation from more locations, and it will require significantly fewer boreholes. Enhanced geothermal systems can access energy from dry and impermeable rock, opening the window to distributed, ultra-efficient heat and power co-generation. The expertise of the EERA members is crucial in the project because GEMex is advancing into unknown territories and builds upon the experience made so far by the JP Geothermal.

Consumers play a crucial role in the renewables revolution, and in the overall transition of the energy sector towards a flexible and sustainable energy system. This transition is complex and the role of the end users is undergoing profound changes, with consumers increasingly being empowered to participate actively in the production and use of energy. With its interdisciplinary approach, melding economic, environmental and social impacts, the EERA´s Joint Programme e3s is well positioned to better understand the complex interplay between markets, technologies, policy decisions, public acceptance and consumer behaviour. Examples of projects stemming from JP e3s collaboration and focusing on consumers´ empowerment are: INSPIRE-GRID (EU FP7 project), which aims to enhance stakeholder participation in future grid infrastructures; PEAKapp (EU Horizon2020 project), which has set its sights on developing smart services that can best utilise electricity from renewable sources, whether ‘peak electricity’ tariff discounts or Facebook customer connections.

Together, these examples reveal the source of so many of the technological breakthroughs behind the news reports we read daily. But they also demonstrate something more: the vital importance of sustaining support for the European energy research community, so that the research capabilities which underpin Europe’s technological leadership in the clean energy race may be consolidated, and strengthened.

Sustainable mobility for the future

The road to a low carbon economy will not be paved without the decarbonization of the transport sector which in 2015 contributed ~25% of the total EU-28 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Sustainable mobility is hence a must in the foreseeable future – not least because any failure to support it would strengthen the case for continued use of fossil fuels. The solution will be a transport sector depending on multiple technologies, from electric propulsion to hydrogen, renewable gas and biofuels.

The European Energy Research Alliance has mounted a sustained bid to innovate in this field. 

 Mobility is one of the key application sectors where the EERA Joint Programme on Energy Storage (JP ES) plays a crucial role. EERA researchers are exploring 19 technologies covering electrochemical, chemical, thermal, mechanical, superconducting magnetic and electrical storage. Through the Joint Programme, universities and research centers strategically coordinate their research to further improve rates of discovery and work in close collaboration with industry, The Technology Development Roadmap on Energy Storage towards 2030, launched in October 2017 and jointly developed by EERA JP ES and EASE – the European Association for Energy Storage – is an example of such collaboration. The roadmap includes recommendations for R&D policies and regulatory developments to support Europe´s competitiveness in energy storage. One of the key areas JP Energy Storage researchers are working on is batteries, developing technologies which support the European local competitive battery manufacturing industry, thus making Europe more resilient against external factors affecting the battery supply chain and making electromobility more affordable to citizens. By 2025, the European battery market is estimated to be €250 billion/year worth, and part of this market is directly related to the transport sector.

In the future, much of our energy is expected to come from prosumers downloading unused energy from their cars and electrical appliances back into the grid. As outlined in the SET-Plan action on Sustainable Transport, the development of battery manufacturing plants and infrastructure for electric vehicles will be crucial to future energy management. The SET-Plan further outlines means of lowering Europe’s road transport emissions – currently around a quarter of our greenhouse gas emissions and rising.

Another important means of reducing greenhouse gases will be the development of advanced and sustainable biofuels to meet the EU’s 3-4% mandate for green fuels by 2030. With a significant number of their members participating in the projects BRISK & BRISK2, the EERA Joint Programme on Bioenergy has played and will play a key role in the success of biofuels implementation by funding researchers working on biological and thermal biomass conversion facilities across Europe and enabling transnational access to biofuels research infrastructures. In BRISK2, 65 biofuel facilities are available for a team of 15 partners, belonging mainly to JP on Bioenergy, from 11 EU countries. This successful outcome in terms of transnational access to research infrastructures is complemented by the AMBITION project, coordinated by the EERA JP on Bioenergy, aiming at developing a long-term joint European Community Research and Innovation Agenda on the integration of biofuels production and surplus grid electricity valorization. The current fragmentation in energy systems and an increasing share of intermittent energy ask for solutions providing integration and flexibility in the system. AMBITION targets the challenge of system flexibility by creating a bridge between two forms of energy carriers, e.g. grid electricity and biofuels, resulting in lower costs and improved sustainability.

These sorts of energy development blueprints support the goals of the EU´s Strategic Energy Technology action plans. Through international collaboration balanced with national synergies and industry involvement, EERA researchers are helping to smooth the path to the EU’s 2020 climate goals. Our projects are also breaking the new research ground needed to meet our obligations under the Paris Climate Agreement.

The low carbon economy that we want our children and grandchildren to enjoy will not appear overnight and the mechanisms to bring it about are not always visible nor, in some case, extant. But through diligent and methodical research programmes we can lay the foundations for that world, and cost-effectively improve our own in the process.

Cutting-edge low-carbon energy solutions

‘Cutting edge’ is a tough description to apply to energy technologies. What was ahead of the curve yesterday so often becomes an also-ran by tomorrow. Equally, the pace of change is moving so fast that today’s “normal” – Tesla’s in car showrooms or cost-competitive offshore wind – appeared to be pipedreams in the recent past. In the absence of certainty, we can only research the best prospects on offer – not least because without doing so, their failure is often a fait accompli. To reach its climate and energy goals, Europe needs cutting edge low carbon energy solutions. Here are a few examples of cutting edge research areas and technologies EERA researchers have been working on.

Artificial photosynthesis

Solar fuel could be one of the most promising boosters to emissions reductions that you have never heard of. Derived from artificial photosynthesis, a breakthrough technology converting solar energy into chemical energy, it involves producing hydrogen or carbon-based fuels by transforming solar into chemical energy. Small amounts of hydrogen have already been produced through water-splitting reactions in a process that uses synthetic biology and hybrid systems to mimic natural photosynthetic processes – light-harvesting, charge separation or molecule synthesis. One day it could power our cars, planes and chemicals manufacturing. The EERA’s Advanced Materials and Processes for Energy Application (JP AMPEA) Joint Programme is contributing to turning the dream into a reality through collaboration on cutting edge materials research. Members of JP AMPEA and other researchers are exploring several exciting avenues including: the use of biological cells to host machinery that can generate complex fuel molecules; photoelectrocatalysis or the combination of Solar PV semiconductor materials with water electrolysis, and the co-electrolysis of CO2 and water via a high temperature solid oxide cell to generate syngas. Research is still at an early stage but has shown great potential and [made] significant progress.

Competitive solar fuels could be produced on an industrial scale in the near future, with demonstration projects forecasted by 2025, allowing storing solar energy as a fuel for use in mobility and domestic applications. If deployed across Europe, the technology should lead to zero emissions for the production of fuels and commodity chemicals by 2050.

Hydrogen technologies

Researchers at the EERA’s Joint Programme Fuel Cells & Hydrogen (JP FCH) are developing hydrogen technologies to maximise the use of renewable energy sources of all sorts (wind, solar and biomass).  For instance, through the Horizon2020 (ECRIA) BALANCE project, partners from the JP FCH are exploring hydrogen technology that can match variable renewable energies with human demand for electricity. Researchers are developing reversible high temperature steam electrolysers which can create hydrogen from the excess electricity created by wind and solar at peak times – and then convert the hydrogen back into electricity for use when the sun has gone down, or the wind has calmed. It could also be converted into a CO2-neutral transport fuel. The technology will support the broad penetration of renewable  electricity into the European energy system, distributed over all major infrastructures and with great advantage for local communities, thanks to high efficiencies also at small scale.

This field has high potential but considerable research is still needed to ensure a durable and sustainable uptake of the technologies involved. The EERA FCH Joint Programme has been working to harmonise and streamline long-term research in the field, integrating fragmented national research into a European Agenda and accelerating its potential deployment, in line with the objectives of the EU’s SET-Plan to accelerate the development and deployment of low carbon technologies.  The JP FCH has been crucial in creating a structural, continuous bridge between academia/research institutions, industry and policymaking platforms.

High performance materials for sustainable and safe nuclear energy

The SET-Plan also covers the safe use of nuclear energy and here too, EERA researchers have punched above their weight, coordinating the EU (FP7) MatISSE project, focusing on cross-cutting activities related to materials used in fuel and structural elements of safe and sustainable advanced nuclear systems. The project contributes to the overall objectives of the EERA Joint Programme Nuclear Materials (JPNM) to qualify and develop high performance materials for sustainable and safe nuclear energy, integrating research on materials innovation to increase the safety and sustainability of nuclear power. Promising lines of inquiry could contribute to: reducing the volumes of high level radioactive waste to a tenth – or even a hundredth – of current levels; reducing radioactive waste lifetime from 100,000 to 1000 years; a 20-30% energy efficiency increase.

A particular focus of JP NM research is on closed nuclear fuel cycles which reprocess and partly reuse their own spent fuel, so minimising the amount of hazardous waste that needs to be stored and the time it needs to be stored for. Closed nuclear fuel cycles which reuse fuel reduce waste burden and increase resource utilization, thus supporting a nuclear circular economy. Generation IV reactors can be built and, potentially, could provide energy for many centuries to come. But operational safety will be paramount – and this is a demanding requirement, with the potential to impact on the performance of structural and fuel materials. The capacity of the materials chosen or designed to withstand high temperatures, prolonged radiation, and chemically aggressive environments will be crucial. EERA’s JP NM is working to thoroughly understand and wisely select materials in this light, and to innovate more broadly in the energy field.


Ongoing support to this type of cutting-edge collaborations will allow continuing probing the frontiers of our technological understanding in ways that bring our decarbonised future closer to the present.  In so doing, we aim and expect to continue bringing the cutting edge firmly into the mainstream.


What do our speakers say? Get some impressions with our short video interviews

Interview with Peter Vis, European Political Strategy Centre

 

 

Interview with Tudor Constantinescu, Principal Adviser to Director General, DG Energy, European Commission

 

 

 

Photo gallery

Some selected impressions from the EERA 10-year Anniversary Conference

Session I: Research & Innovation at the core of the Energy Union

 

 

Session II: Stakeholder collaboration in R&I for EU Energy Transition

 

 

Session III: EERA catalysing European alignment: driving bottom-up alignment, fostering top-down convergence

 

 

Session IV: Megatrends in energy transition

 

 

Session V: The systemic nature of energy transition

 

 

Session VI: Visions for a sustainable energy future

 

 

Networking

 

 

Check out the whole photo gallery